How To Get A Central Locking Problem Fixed

How To Get Central Locking Problems Fixed

Sometimes you may be faced with a central locking problem on your car.  Finding out what the problem is can be very difficult. Door lock issues on its own can be complicated, but having central locking can make diagnosing any problems even more difficult. Remember, having central locking will mean there are even more parts that make up your car’s lock. Identifying which part is faulty often requires a thorough inspection.

Newer cars will usually be fitted with central locking as standard. What the central locking does is open all the doors at the same time. This is done by inserting the key into the lock barrel on one door, or using the remote control part of the key.

Sometimes a door’s lock actuator might fail. It is an electronic part that is fitted to each door which controls the opening and closing of each door’s lock. If a door’s actuator fails, you will find that the door simply won’t open. Other doors on the car will most likely still open.

If you find that none of the doors open it’s often due to an issue with the central locking in general. It could be an electrical issue of some kind.

What If I Have Remote Central Locking Problem?

If your car is fitted with remote central locking another layer of problems is added. Issues like this can be due to something as simple as a faulty remote, other times it’s the remote control unit inside the car. Often, though, it’s really just the battery in the remote key that has run out. All that is needed then is to replace the battery, you will most likely find your doors open again fine.

How Do I Find Out What Central Locking Part Is Faulty?

If you can’t quite find out why your central locking doesn’t work then it’s always advisable to get help of a professional. They will be able to pinpoint exactly what part is required by testing the system with their specialist testing equipment. Remember, it’s advisable to replace any parts until you actually know what is required.

About Kurt Schleier

Resident classic car enthusiast and blogger at Clickmechanic.

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